What a healthy day of eating looks like

I’ve had many people ask me what I eat. What do I eat for dinner? What’s a good breakfast? What do you snack on? I do plan out what I’m going to eat the day before and make sure that I have my snacks lined up (very important) and make sure I’m sticking to my appropriate calorie intake per day. We know that input = output. What you put into your body is what you will get out of it. You can’t take in more calories than you expend, otherwise you will gain weight. I follow a really easy way to figure out if I’m taking in too much. Chef Candice Kumai says it best – take your ideal weight, add a 0 to the end of that number and that is the net caloric intake you should have per day. Visit her site for good for you recipes – http://www.candicekumai.com/ Now this does mean that you have to count calories but after a few days it gets easier to calculate.

Here is an example from my own nutrition plan. This is what I had to eat one day this week:

Breakfast
2 coffees with cream & sugar = 102 Calories
oatmeal with 4 strawberries and 1 tbs flaxseed = 170 Calories

Morning snack greek yogurt = 100 Calories

Lunch lean cuisine 250 Calories

Afternoon snack banana = 72 Calories

Dinner
broiled chicken breast with garlic & olive oil = 175 Calories
red skinned baked potato with salt & pepper = 130 Calories
broccoli = 80.00

Evening snack handful of dried apricots = 75 calories

Total Calories = 1154 Calories

Try counting calories for a week. You can use a tool to assit you. The one I like is http://www.calorieking.com/foods/

Good Luck! Let me know how you do!

Counting calories when you’re training…or when you’re not!

Counting calories is something almost all of us have done at one point in our lives. Some of us ball park the number of calories we take in and have “cheat days”. Some of us count and document everything that goes in our mouths. Well, almost. Regardless of how far you take your calorie counting, don’t forget to deduct for what you’re burning during exercising!

All of us have a standard calorie intake to maintain our body weight and fuel our activities. The 2000 calorie diet is an average – not necessarily what your own body needs. When we eat more than what we burn, we’ll gain weight. Input=output. Period.

There is a cute little chef that I like – Candice Kumai (http://www.candicekumai.com/). She describes the best way to determine your calorie intake is to figure out what your ideal body weight should be, add a 0 on the end of that number, and that’s how many net calories you should be taking in daily. Very simple formula…and good for you easy recipes too!

But don’t forget about the calories you burn while running, walking, biking, swimming, or whatever you’re doing. Runner’s World has a quick and easy formula:
-running: multiply .75 times your weight and that’s how many calories you burned for each mile
-walking: multiply .53 times you weight for each mile

So, if someone where to have an ideal weight of 125 pounds, the daily caloric intake would be 1,250. If they were to maintain that body weight and ran 2 miles they burned an extra 188 calories.

I know it requires a little bit of effort on our part – counting the calories, reading the labels on food we eat, and a little bit of math – but after a week of so we get the idea and can guesstimate these things on our way to a healthier body.